RSS

Tag Archives: basketball

Frank Caliendo as Morgan Freeman as LeBron

Pretty much anything LeBron trends now that he has made the decision to back to Cleveland.  I saw this link on Twitter where comedian Frank Caliendo reads LeBron’s Coming Home essay in the voice of Morgan Freeman on ESPN’s Mike & Mike.  It is very funny.  I enjoyed watching Mike & Mike stifle laughter as he read.

Check it out.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 24, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Syd Reaches 1,000 – Video

Prior to last night’s game (1/22/2014) against Chillicothe, the school recognized Sydney for scoring 1,000 points in her high school career. They presented her with the game ball and gave us a copy of the game. She reached this milestone fairly early in the game so I was able to upload about a four-minute video.

She needed 5 points going into the game to reach 1,000. She got the first two points on a jump shot. The next two came at the free throw line (not see on the video) and the basket that put her over the top was on a driving lay up.

They did stop the game to acknowledge her accomplishment. It was pretty obvious she wasn’t sure what to do, but it was a nice gesture.

She wears #31 for Massie (in blue on the video).

2014 01 21 12H33M PM – Movie 01 from Tony Brackemyre on Vimeo.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 23, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Syd Reaches 1,000

Syd 1000After missing most of her junior season due to an ACL injury, we weren’t sure where Sydney was on her quest to score 1,000 points in her high school career. About a week ago her coach informed us she was 36 points away from hitting the mark. She got her 1,000 point in a shoot out on Sunday.

The picture shown here is from the Wilmington News-Journal. You can read the article on the game and mention of her passing 1,000 on the local sports page of the News-Journal website.

Massie won the game to remain undefeated this season. Syd ended the game with 23 points.

 
1 Comment

Posted by on January 21, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

OGBR Top 25 Seniors

OGBR Top 25 Seniors – Class of 2014

Sydney Brackemyre, 6-1, Clinton Massie

Jenna Burdette, 5-8, Reedsville Eastern

Amanda Cahill, 6-2, Clyde

Stasha Carey, 6-3, Berea Midpark

Kristen Confroy, 5-9, Solon

Sasha Dailey, 5-8, Toledo Rogers

Jenna Gunn, 5-11, Mason

Alexa Hart, 6-3, Columbus Africentric

Regina Hochstetler, 5-8, Berlin Hiland

Trinity Hunter, 6-2, Gahanna Lincoln

Tyra James, 6-0, Cincinnati Winton Woods

Bethany Krause, 5-9, Centerville

Kelsey Mitchell, 5-9, Cincinnati Princeton

Nicole Orr, 5-9, Reynoldsburg

Imani Partlow, 6-0, Cincinnati Winton Woods

Baleigh Reed, 5-9, Twinsburg

Alyssa Rice, 6-3, Reynoldsburg

Megan Sefcik, 5-9, Austintown-Fitch

Laina Snyder, 6-1, West Holmes

Terra Stapleton, 6-5, Proctorville Fairland

Kaylee Stroemple, 5-11, North Canton Hoover

Korrin Taylor, 5-6, Canton McKinley

Marquia Turner, 5-8, North Canton Hoover

Makayla Waterman, 6-2, Kettering Fairmont

Kathryn Westbeld, 6-2, Kettering Fairmont

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 8, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Six area players named McDonalds All-American nominees

Congratulations to our local players for being added to this prestigious list!

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 7, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Coming Back From Injury

sydIn the past I’ve re-posted some information from Jim Dabbelt’s blog. He does a great job promoting girls high school basketball in the state of Ohio.

On October 25 he had a post about some of the girls in our area coming back from injury. It included Syd and one of her Angel teammates, Olivia Philpot. He did a nice job with the article and is a great voice for the girls in our area. Stop by his blog to keep up with what’s happening this season.

Everyone knows that Christmas is set for December 25 as it is every year, when the small children run downstairs to rip open their presents before the crack of dawn.

For several young ladies around Ohio, it will seem like Christmas morning as they wake today, because they know that all of their hard work they put into the game of basketball all summer long is about to pay off. Today is the day a lot of us have been waiting for.

Today…. is the start of basketball season.

Girls’ basketball teams can begin practice today across Ohio, and while several girls look at this as the beginning of a new season, a few area girls are chomping at the bit even more, as they prepare to prove to everyone that they are back.

It has been a rough year for injuries, as several girls around Ohio are out to make a statement to everyone that they are back… and better than ever.

Seniors Sydney Brackemyre, Olivia Philpot, and Amy Bullimore are all recovering from knee injuries, while sophomore Sydney Bates had shoulder surgery in the fall and is ready to return to the court soon.

Brackemyre, a 6-1 senior at Clinton Massie who verballed to the University of Louisville, suffered a season-ending ACL tear on December 29 of last year, and while she has suffered through the long road to recovery, she knows the extra time she has been away will ultimately be worth it.

“My recovery seemed like it was never going to end, but now I’m back and playing,” Brackemyre said yesterday. “It feels good to know I had the extra couple of months to recover. Most people come back from an ACL team in about 6-7 months, but in my case it was a full nine months.”

The Massie senior was frustrated waiting to get back, but she understands it will help her prepare better for a return.

“My doctor was very cautious with the things he would allow me to do, which was entirely frustrating at the time, but I know it will pay off,” she said. “I have had so much support from family and friends that told me the waiting would be worth it.”

Brackemyre has been working on her physical part of the game while she has been out of action. She stated she is stronger than she has ever been, and worked on the things she was allowed to. The future Cardinal will be wearing a brace until December.

Philpot had her ACL surgery on July 5, as the Middletown Madison senior will miss most if not all of her senior season. Her goal to return in January will be based on a functional assessment next month by Dr. James Klosterman, and that will determine if a return mid-season is even going to be reasonable.

Philpot, who opened up her recruiting back up after choosing not to attend Youngstown State as earlier planned, has been doing physical therapy and training at Ignition for the past several months, making solid progress each week. Philpot understands the risk of returning too soon, and knows there is a bitter prize down the road, playing basketball in college.

Bullimore also hopes for a strong senior year after suffering the same injury last season. The 6-1 senior, who has yet to choose a college, was recently cleared to begin playing again, and knows it has been a long road back.

“I did rehab at least three times per week with my therapist, but everyday by myself,” Bullimore said, very much looking forward to the season to begin. “Sometimes it was so painful or hard I didn’t think it would ever get easier.”

“I’m not sure there was a day that I didn’t find a hoop to shoot on, and continued to improve my shot daily,” she added, who credited Dr. Shaw, therapist Shaun Tubbs and trainer Tammy Pollack with a huge role in her recovery. “I had the right support from my coach and others to get my mind off the setback and look to the bigger picture.”

She also learned a lot about herself while she was on the sidelines watching her team last season.

“Recovery played a big role with my personality,” she said. “It helped me to learn what it’s really like to be a teammate. I sat on the sideline cheering on my teammates, with a sense of pride and urgency to get back on the court.”

Bates, one of Ohio’s top sophomores, also looks for a successful return after suffering a shoulder injury this summer that hampered her play through her summer season. After battling the pain for the month of July, she finished the summer with shoulder surgery on July 31. She had the ligaments and cartilage of her shoulder stabilized was told that recovery would take her 12-16 weeks.

For the first six weeks of rehab, Bates would be forced to wear an immobilizer the majority of each day, but even though she couldn’t do much to work on her game, Bates would keep her stamina up by walking 6-8 miles each evening. She also spent time ball handling and shooting with her non-surgical arm.

Bates was cleared to run at eight weeks, and for the next four weeks, she would cardio at least 90 minutes per day, and work on therapy. This past Tuesday, Bates was cleared to do all aspects of basketball except for contact. During the last three months, Bates has learned a lot about motivation, commitment, and effort and never to take your health for granted.

Also, Alter’s Emma Bockrath, one of Ohio’s top players in her class, looks to put her ACL injury behind her and come out strong and leave her mark on the new basketball season.

For these five, plus others recovering from injuries, today is the beginning of new hope and new dreams.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on October 30, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Words for Parents as Kids Perform

kicking1When my kids were younger, I would volunteer to coach their teams. Like a lot of parents, I’ve coached YMCA basketball and soccer teams, “Paw Ball” basketball in Indiana, Upward basketball here in Ohio and was a “band parent” when my son was in marching band. I’ve also been through the transition of moving from primary coach to a cheering parent on the sidelines or in the stands.

I thought what Tim Elmore shared in a recent post was great advice for parents. He wrote about what parents should say as they watch their kids perform and it would be worth your time to read the whole post.

If you’ve been to sporting events, you probably have a long list of what parents shouldn’t say as they watch their kids. In the post, based on psychological research, the three healthiest statements moms and dads can make as they perform are:

Before the Competition:
1. Have fun.
2. Play hard.
3. I love you.

After the competition:
1. Did you have fun?
2. I’m proud of you.
3. I love you.

Then he shared six simple words that parents should say based on what they heard from college athletes: “I love to watch you play.” If we could keep that as the primary part of our vocabulary, it would free the students to perform and the parents to cheer.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on October 24, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

2014 Commits for Card Women’s Hoops

20130209-191655.jpgThe Louisville Women’s Basketball program picked up their fourth commit for the class of 2014 yesterday. Keil Moore of ProspectsNation.com had a nice article on the latest commit along with the previous three (including Syd).

Getting excited about Louisville Women’s Basketball.

After a great run that saw the Louisville women’s basketball program make it all the way to the national championship game, coach Jeff Walz and his staff have managed to capitalize with a good deal of recruiting success. Myisha Hines-Allen’s decision to pick Louisville over Georgia Tech and West Virginia is the next example of the success carrying over to recruiting momentum.

“The school in general was an amazing place,” Hines-Allen, the No. 13 prospect in the ELITE 100, said. “I felt like home while I was there.”

Hines-Allen picked Louisville after making an unofficial visit to Georgia Tech in early June in addition to official visits to Louisville and West Virginia in August.

The 6-foot-2 forward has a combination of size and athleticism that is rarely seen on the recruiting circuit. She is a much improved perimeter shooter and is also capable of putting the ball on the deck and making a play. She should fit in well at the future ACC school as she shares similarities with current rising senior Sarah Hammond.

“The style of play was also a huge factor,” she added.

With the addition of Hines-Allen, Louisville now has four talented wings and forwards on the way to campus next year. Mariya Moore of Oakland, Calif., Arianna Freeman of Manassas, Va., and Sydney Brackemyre of Cincinnati, Ohio. With the forward positions locked up for the next couple of years, look for Louisville to focus heavily on adding true post play and a point guard with their remaining scholarships. Jatarie White of Charlotte, N.C., Dekeiya Cohen of Charleston, S.C., and Gabby Green of Oakland, Calif., are players Louisville may still be looking to add to their 2014 class.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 4, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Here’s to Camp!

Bball Camp #2 2013It’s been a little while since I’ve posted anything on the blog, but one of my reasons/excuses is that last week I was gone at camp. And it was a great week!

Turns out this was my 9th summer leading the Basketball 2 week of camp at Butler Springs. Our week is an interesting mix of basketball camp, cheer camp, science camp and Kids Cafe (cooking) camp. It sounds a bit different, but it works!

I had a great group of adults who served as faculty and we ended up the week with four baptisms in the camp pool and two more taking place at home. We had several campers from our home church as well as several faculty. My son and daughter served on faculty along with Joe’s girlfriend.

Here are some pics from the week:

Families discussing the theme for the day from the book of Ephesians:

IMG_2291

Some of the basketball skills stations

IMG_2308

One of the baptisms at the end of the week:

IMG_2317

 
3 Comments

Posted by on August 7, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Rise of Louisville Athletics

20130209-191303.jpgSince Syd made the decision to go to UL, we have paid more attention to what happens to the Cardinals. Obviously the men won the National Championship in basketball and the women went to the championship game, but they have also seen success in other sports.

I saw a link to the following article on Twitter today. I don’t know much about the history of the athletic department, but according to this article, it was in bad shape. The author talks about the improvements that have occurred in the program and the steps that were taken to bring that about. He refers to the book Good to Great by Jim Collins, which interested me as well. Thought it was worth sharing.

You can read the original article on the Forbes website.

Louisville athletics was a pariah. An organization so mis-aligned, so bloated in inefficiency that the very conference it helped form had sued to expunge the university from its ranks. A desperate attempt to prevent the department’s disease of non-compliance from spreading to the other members of the league. There was little hope for Louisville, its faith seemingly sealed as terminal.

In his influential work on organizational management, “Good To Great”, author Jim Collins refers to the circumstances Louisville had fallen into as the “Doom Loop”. The organization lacked internal accountability, failed to achieve credibility within its own community and had lost all authenticity with the college athletics community as a whole. It was not that the department did not want to change, but rather that it lacked the discipline to do so.

Those were the circumstances that faced Tom Jurich when he became the athletic director at the University of Louisville in 1997. Jurich understood that if there was any chance of salvation, he needed to reconstruct the athletic department to be built upon a foundation of accountability, integrity and honesty. Then, and only then, could a culture be born that would filter its way through the department and move it slowly out of a vicious cycle of disappointing results and stalled momentum.

“The department was out of control when it came to issues like compliance and Title IX,” says Jurich. “We were staring down the barrel of a gun and potentially facing the death penalty from the NCAA. Either we made a decision right then and there to change the culture once and for all or we would forever be mired in our own self-sabotage,” he adds.

For Jurich and his leadership team, part of that process involved confronting the hardest decision a manager must ever make – replacing individuals who did not fit within the cultural boundaries they set out for the department. In fact, within the first five years of tenure, there were more than 130 changes within the staff, or almost 50% of the entire department. Such high turnover is almost unheard of from any organization with the multi-million dollar revenues, and is testament to the dire situation Louisville found itself in.

According to Jurich, “The ride [Louisville] was embarking on wouldn’t be easy – we were going to need tough, self-motivated people who were selflessly driven by their passion for the department and the university as a whole. If they weren’t hungry and humble, they weren’t getting on the bus.”

Once the wrong people were off the bus, and the organization’s cultural foundation began to take shape, Jurich’s administration was only then able to begin to systematically address the issues that were plaguing the department. The most pressing of which was gender equity, or rather the total lack thereof.

“When it came to non-compliance with Title IX, Louisville was in dire straights,” says Jurich. “We had Lamar Daniel, a leading gender equity consultant, come to campus and tell us that we were the ‘worst program he had ever seen’. Here was someone who had spent over two decades conducting investigations for the Office of Civil Rights and who was practically at a loss for words on just how bad our situation was.”

While the problem Louisville faced was evident, the solution was less clear. At the time, the department’s budget was $14.8 million, or just 17% of the $85 million it had risen to today. Just about every area of the department needed improvement and additional resources. The problem was that not only did the Cardinals need to fundraise, but also that they needed to invest the majority of the money back into women’s sports, none of which would provide any financial return on investment.

“Our backs were against the wall, but we had no choice but to do what was right. I caught a great deal of criticism in those early days as we tried to pull ourselves out of the quicksand, but the reality is that without the tremendous support of the Louisville community and our boosters, we would have never made it out. ” Jurich explains.

In the words of Jim Collins, Louisville needed to confront the brutal facts of their current reality, while retaining resolute faith that they would prevail in the end, regardless of the difficulty. Breakthrough for organizations that face such adversity comes through making good decisions, each of which is meticulously implemented and accumulated one on top of the other. Yet more importantly, without the guidance of Jurich and his senior administration, whose keen leadership focused attention away from the disillusion of the circumstance and towards the delicious potential of the future, the Cardinals’ never would have made it.

Ever so slowly, Louisville began its slow climb out the college athletics basement and towards respectability. With a blue-collar like work ethic, the department inched towards ever-greater achievements, each victory built upon the last. Yet, while that work ethic Jurich had installed helped turn the tide for Louisville, many of its teams still failed to achieve their full potential. Like most organizations that make great strides in a short time, the greatest threat they face to continued progress is the stagnation of their culture.

His solution was the installation of a philosophy known as “Louisville First, Cards Forever” or “L1C4”. The concept was simple – the name on the front of the player’s jerseys was far more important than the one on the back. Pitino wanted his players to understand that they were playing not for themselves, not even for their teammates, but for the university community as a whole. It was no surprise then that the entire Louisville athletics department soon adopted the L1C4 philosophy as its own. After all, it was the perfect epitome of the cultural mindset Jurich began to implement within the organization when he arrived a decade earlier.

L1C4 came full circle for Louisville during the quarterfinal game of the 2013 NCAA tournament against the Blue Devils of Duke. Cardinals’ guard Kevin Ware landed awkwardly after attempting to block a basket, suffering a compound fracture to his leg live on national television. The gruesome injury sent a debilitating shockwave through the team, bringing to a grinding halt to the Cardinals’ seemingly unstoppable momentum. In a single moment, the dreams of the entire Louisville nation were brought to the brink extinction, resting precariously once again on the edge. Yet the Cardinals had been there before, had seen this void and in that very moment decided that this time was different, that they would not go quietly into the night again without a fight. The Cardinals rallied around Kevin Ware, his injury a profound reminder of just how far they had come and that they no longer had an opportunity, but rather an obligation to win. The rest of course was history.

Some 15 years after Jurich took over as athletic director, the Louisville Cardinals have made history. The university became the first to win a BCS football game, a national championship in men’s basketball, play for the national championship in women’s basketball, and make the College World Series all in one year. Even more significantly, the University received an invitation to the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC), a move that all but guarantees stability for many years to come in tumultuous college athletics landscape. For any other university, achieving even one of those feats would be cause for tremendous celebration, but for the University of Louisville, anything less would have been a disappointment.

By human nature, the majority of people do not want to hear that success comes from years of effort or discipline. They prefer to think that it emanates from some predetermined advantage or is just the luck of circumstance. The transformation that occurred at the University of Louisville was certainly not the inevitable, nor was it a function of circumstance. Rather, it is the culmination of years of calculated risk and exceptional hard work. More significantly, it serves as testament to the importance of visionary leadership, organizational buy-in, and the courage to carry on when everything seems against you.

Every morning, Tom Jurich asks his department to answer a simple question, “How are we going to wake up and become better as an athletic department next year?”

The University of Louisville stays humble and hungry.

This post was co-authored by Justin Vine.

Jason Belzer is Founder of GAME, Inc. and CSA, and a Professor of Organizational Behavior and Sports Law at Rutgers University. Follow him on Twitter @JasonBelzer.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 3, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,367 other followers