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Tag Archives: teens

Images over Words

snapchatSeveral weeks ago I posted about the growth of Instagram and how it surpassed Twitter in number of users. It appears that people prefer images over words.

After meeting with a group of junior high students, Tim Elmore found that trend is showing up in how teens communicate with each other. Text messaging is being replaced by apps that allow teens to share images.

Here’s a small portion of what he posted on May 6th about the growth of images over words.

Snapchat — an app that allows users to send photos to one another that disappear after a few seconds—has taken over many teen’s portable devices. So has Instagram. It may well be the future of phone interaction. Just like Facebook, once parents and teachers began to figure out how to use text messaging, students were bound to find new ways to communicate.

It wasn’t that long ago I reported to readers that teens today send about 3,000 texts a month, or about a hundred a day. That’s changing now. And not just for teens but for all ages. As a whole, people are texting less now than we used to. According to Chetan Sharma Consulting, “The average U.S. cell phone user sends about 628 text messages per quarter, down 8 percent from a year ago.”

Technology and communication are ever-changing. We’ve gone from land line to cell phone to email to MySpace to Facebook to Twitter to Snapchat and other forms of staying connected. For those who work with students, it’s interesting to see where the trends go.

What do you see students using to communicate with each other?

 
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Posted by on May 7, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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How Teens Use Cell Phones

Youth Ministry Media shares infographics about teenagers and technology.  The recent posting, Teens Cell Phone Usage, provides some interesting information.

A few things I noticed:

1) 75% of 12-17 year olds have a cell phone

2) Teens send/receive 2,108 texts a month (wonder how that stacks up against youth workers?)

3) 70% received a text from someone not in their contacts.

There is some good info for parents, too.  I am a big fan of texting as a tool to stay in touch with both teens and adults.  Good to see how it is being used and also to be aware of how we need to be cautious.

teens-cellphone-usage

 
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Posted by on December 9, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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Teens, FB Friends and Social Media

Youth Ministry Media is a resource I have referenced before. They seek to help youth workers communicate with teens. They provide interesting information the use of social media in our culture and some free resources for youth workers.

Over the weekend they referenced two different pieces of information from Pew Internet and American Life Project. One had to do with the average number of friends teens have on Facebook and another that talks about what they share. Interesting that girls on average have more FB friends and that sometimes teens post false information to protect their privacy.

teen-facebook-friends-infographic

teens and social media

 
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Posted by on June 10, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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Texting While Driving Fact Sheet

iPhone“We’ve been talking on the phone for 80 years. We’ve been driving for 100 years. It’s only recently that we’ve tried to combine the two.”

That is a quote that is featured on the Texting While Driving Fact Sheet provided by The Center for Parent/Youth Understanding. CPYU is providing this information to teens and parents to help raise awareness of the dangers of texting while driving.

You can view/print the Fact Sheet online at CPYU’s Digital Kids Initiative webpage.

Feel free to pass this on to other parents and teen drivers.

 
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Posted by on May 21, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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Text Blokker video – funny

I was watching a video from Central Christian Church in Las Vegas and the thumbnail for the Text Blokker video showed up at the end. Pretty funny and might sound like some of the texts students you know have sent. Too bad Text Blokker isn’t a real app.

Text Blokker from Central Films on Vimeo.

 
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Posted by on February 7, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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Teens and Changing Technology

Technology is in a constant state of change. The latest buzz has been about the unveiling of the iPhone 5. I saw a tweet today that said the Apple store is off-line as they update their stock. (It is off-line….I checked!) If you feel like you just can’t keep, welcome to the club.

In light of that, I thought a post on Doug Field’s blog was timely and informative.  In this entry. he talks with Jonathan McKee, a youth worker, speaker and author.  They discussed the changes in technology and social media and specifically how teens are using these various outlets.

Here’s a few of the questions and answers.  Thought their thoughts on texting and Twitter were interesting and worth watching.

DOUGI’m almost afraid to post something about technology, because it might be out of date by the time I hit POST. In your book The New Breed you talk about how much technology has shifted in the last 5 years alone. Give us a glimpse of some of these big changes.

JONATHAN: It’s even scarier talking about technology in a book, in fear that it will be out of date by the time the book goes to print. When the first edition of this book came out five years ago (which really isn’t too long ago), MySpace was still a social network contender. Now, most people chuckle when you mention the site (“It’s so three minutes ago!”). In the last 5 years…

MySpace has shriveled while Facebook has become the social networking powerhouse. As of the end of 2011, 93% of 12-17-year old social media users have Facebook pages, while only 24% have a MySpace.

Pinterest has proven to be a major player in the social networking scene, especially among women (I already have a page so I can see my daughter’s posts of her artwork).

•As texting and social networking grew, young people use email less. You know this if you’ve tried to email a kid—they don’t email back. Text them, you’ll get a response in 10 seconds.

Smartphone ownership crossed the 50% mark recently, with 55.5% of US subscribers now owning smartphones. 58% of 13-17-year olds now own a smart phone, compared to 36% last year, and 74% of 25-34 year-olds own smartphones, up from 59% last year (NielsenWire, 9/10/12). This increase has obviously boosted mobile browsing to new levels

•The time people spend on apps per day finally surpassed traditional web browsing. (TechCrunch)

DOUGSo, I hate being asked about the future, but I’ll ask you–what do you think is next?

JONATHAN: Wow, you’re asking me to go on a limb here. I usually don’t like to predict the future as much as provide a glimpse of what is current. I’ll push the envelope here a little bit and give two predictions based on recent changes:

Texting has hit its peak. I’m not saying that texting is dying… I don’t think it’s going anywhere. It’s simple, quick, easy… and fun. But Nielson’s teenage texting numbers actual dropped a notch in the third quarter of 2011 for the first time in years! Personally, I think this is because of the rise of smart-phone ownership, mentioned above. More young people can Facebook each other or Tweet. I think these alternatives will trim the edge off of texting. Texting will stay strong… but I think we’ve seen its peak.

Twitter is on the rise. In the past year I chuckled when people mentioned Twitter and Facebook in the same sentence. Over 90% of teenagers are on Facebook, and at last count, about 16% of online teenagers were on Twitter  (and 95% of American teenagers are online). But watch closely… that Twitter number is growing. Why? Young people are still TV addicts and they can only watch people like Howie Mandel on their favorite shows Tweeting their fans so many times before they think, “I’ve gotta get me that!!”

 
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Posted by on September 12, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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New Words in the Dictionary

While on vacation last week, I was checking email and got one from Youth Ministry Media. It’s a weekly update for Youth Workers pertaining to students, technology and how to communicate with students.

One particular article in the email talked about 35 new words that were being added to the Oxford Dictionary.  I thought it was interesting and wondered about the process of selecting words to add to the dictionary.

Here are the words.  I was familiar with most of the words, but not all of them.  (Mankini – ewwwwww!)  What about you? Any thoughts?

1. Bling (n): Expensive, ostentatious clothing and jewelry.

2. Bromance (n): A close but non-sexual relationship between two men.

3. Chillax (v): Calm down and relax.

4. Crunk (adj): Very excited or full of energy.

5. D’oh (ex): Exclamation used to comment on a foolish or stupid action, especially one’s own.

6. Droolworthy (adj): Extremely attractive or desirable.

7. Frankenfood (n): Genetically modified food.

8. Grrrl (n): A young woman regarded as independent and strong or aggressive, especially in her attitude to men or in her sexuality (A blend of “Grrrr” and “Girl.”)

9. Guyliner (n): Eyeliner that is worn by men.

10. Hater (n): A person who greatly dislikes a specified person or thing.

11. Illiterati (n): People who are not well educated or well informed about a particular subject or sphere of activity.

12. Infomania (n): The compulsive desire to check or accumulate news and information, typically via mobile phone or computer.

13. Jeggings (n): Tight-fitting stretch trousers for women, styled to resemble a pair of denim jeans.

14. La-la Land (n): A fanciful state or dream world. Also, Los Angeles.

15. Locavore (n): A person whose diet consists only or principally of locally grown or produced food.

16. Mankini (n): A brief one-piece bathing garment for men, with a T-back.

17. Mini-Me (n): A person closely resembling a smaller or younger version of another.

18. Muffin Top (n): A roll of fat visible above the top of a pair of women’s tight-fitting low-waisted trousers.

19. Muggle (n): A person who is not conversant with a particular activity or skill.

20. Noob (n): A person who is inexperienced in a particular sphere or activity, especially computing or the use of the Internet.

21. Obvs (adv): Obviously.

22. OMG (ex): Used to express surprise, excitement, or disbelief. (Dates back to 1917.)

23. Po-po (n): The police.

24. Purple State (n): A US state where the Democratic and Republican parties have similar levels of support among voters.

25. Screenager (n): A person in their teens or twenties who has an aptitude for computers and the Internet.

26. Sexting (n): The sending of sexually explicit photographs or messages via mobile phone.

27. Textspeak (n): Language regarded as characteristic of text messages, consisting of abbreviations, acronyms, initials, emoticons. (wut hpns win u write lyk dis.)

28. Totes (adv): Totally.

29. Truthiness (n): the quality of seeming or being felt to be true, even if not necessarily true.

30. Twitterati (n): Keen or frequent users of the social networking site Twitter.

31. Unfriend (v): Remove (someone) from a list of friends or contacts on a social networking site.

32. Upcycle (v): Reuse (discarded objects or material) in such a way as to create a product of higher quality or value than the original.

33. Whatevs (ex, adv): Whatever.

34. Whovian (n): A fan of the British science-fiction television series Doctor Who.

35. Woot (ex): (Especially in electronic communication) Used to express elation, enthusiasm, or triumph

 
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Posted by on August 13, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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