Barna on Adoption

BU-110513-infographic2As many of you know, we are in the process of adoption. Max was placed with us back in October and we are working our way through the steps toward finalization. For the last couple of years, our awareness of adoption has grown, which caused me to check out this article from the Barna Group.

Through our own consideration of adding to our family through adoption and several of our friends who have adopted or are considering it, I found this information to be interesting.

Here are the highlights of the article. You can read the entire article on the Barna Group website.

1) Today, there are more than 150 million orphans worldwide.

An orphan is defined as a child with at least one deceased parent, and there are enough orphans in the world today to fill a Super Bowl stadium—not just once, but 180 times. There are also 18 million “double orphans,” those who’ve lost both parents, in need of a home.

2) While one–quarter of all adults say they have seriously considered adoption, only 2% have actually done so.

Adoption serves one of the world’s greatest needs, but while it’s deeply meaningful, it’s not always easy, for many reasons. And the gap between those considering adoption and those who go actually adopt reflects the many challenges that crop up to prevent needy children from finding homes.

3) Practicing Christians are more than twice as likely to adopt than the general population.

While Christians have built a reputation for many of the things they are against, adoption and foster care are emerging as a cause they are for. While only 2% of all Americans have adopted, this rises to 5% among practicing Christians.

4) The global weight of adoption efforts is carried by just 2% of Americans.

As some of the most privileged people in the world, it’s no surprise that Americans are leading adoption efforts internationally. But when this is put into statistical perspective, this disproportion becomes far more striking: Since American adoptions comprise nearly half of all adoptions worldwide, this means the global weight of adoption efforts rests on the shoulders of the 2% of American adoptive parents.

5) The typical adoptive family is a multi–ethnic one.

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