Chase the Lion – Mark Batterson

chase-the-lion-mark-batterson-mobile-wallpaper-lion-and-textJust over five years ago I posted a review on Mark Batterson’s In a Pit with a Lion on a Snowy Day. Last week I finished reading a follow-up to it called Chase the Lion. The newest offering used In a Pit with a Lion as a literary springboard and continued looking at Benaiah as well as several other of David’s Mighty Men written about in the Old Testament.

The byline of Chase the Lion is this: If Your Dream Doesn’t Scare You, It’s Too Small. Through the pages of the book Batterson refers to David’s mighty men, followers of Jesus from scripture and history and contemporary Christ followers who live out this Lion Chaser manifesto.

As I was reading the book, I would mark quotes that stood out to me and then dog-eared the page so I could find them later. Upon concluding the book, I saw that I had a number of pages with bent corners. Batterson knows how to turn a phrase and pack a punch in a sentence of two.

On page 70 he had this good reminder for those who are chasing a dream God has given them: “We overestimate what we can accomplish in a year or two, but we underestimate what God can accomplish in a decade or two. If you’re discouraged, zoom out. you can’t just dream big; you have to think long.”

Good reminder.

One of the more powerful parts of the book for me personally was near the end when he wrote about the importance of thinking long-term when it comes to the work we are doing in the kingdom of God. Sometimes (or perhaps most of the time) we think about what God is doing for us or for those around us. On page 171 Batterson wrote, “We think that what God does for us is for us, but it’s never just for us. It’s always for the third and fourth generations. We think right here, right now, but God is thinking nations and generations.”

He shared several examples how men and women who lived and served generations ago are still impacting people today. Whether is was planting a church, starting a scholarship, launching a ministry or introducing someone to Jesus, Batterson showed how God used the efforts of previous men and women to impact third and fourth generations.

What a great picture to have in mind as we serve today. To think that the work we are doing now has the potential of impacting or grandchildren, great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren is both humbling and inspiring.

Batterson’s encouragement throughout the book is to continue to Chase the Lion. Whatever God has called to do, our task is to remain faithful and allow Him to take care of the results.


Lion of War Series – a great read!

I was first introduced to the story of Benaiah in Mark Batterson’s book In a Pit With a Lion on a Snowy Day.  In the Lion of War series, author Cliff Graham takes the lives of Benaiah and the other men who make up David’s Mighty Men and brings them to life in a compelling way.

A friend of mine told me about the first book in the series (Day of War) and encouraged me to read it.  I actually got it free from a twitter promotion from  Before I finished reading Day of War, I knew I wanted to get book two, Covenant of War.  Once I purchased it, it only took me a few days to finish.

Graham takes the Biblical accounts of David, The Three and the Thirty (His Mighty Men) and turns them in to a riveting piece of fiction. While the characters and story lines are based on Old Testament scripture, Graham does encourage the reader to read the book as fiction, as he “fills in the blanks” of how he envisions the battles going and the characters reacting.

If you like movies like Gladiator, Braveheart and the like, this is your type of book.  My only problem is this – I am waiting on book 3 to find out what happens next!

In A Pit With A Lion On A Snowy Day

I first read Batterson’s In a Pit with a Lion on a Snowy Day several years ago and then had the opportunity to review it for the Blogging for Books program.  Batterson has become one of my favorite authors and I have had the opportunity to read and review Primal, Soul Print and just recently received The Circle Maker.

In a Pit with a Lion on a Snowy Day is based on the story of Benaiah, one of King David and Solomon’s soldiers, who defeated a lion along with some other remarkable achievements.  Batterson uses Benaiah’s story as a spring-board to talk about how we face opportunities.

Mixing in Biblical references and stories from his own life and the lives of others he knows, Batterson provides seven principles to help Christ followers when confronted with new challenges.  He offers some good insights and make some nice parallels between Benaiah’s (and other Biblical characters) experiences and how we respond to the lions we face.

Chapter 4 on “The Art of Reframing” and chapter 6 called “Playing It Safe is Risky” provided some good challenges to me as I read it.  Overall, it is an excellent book and applies to all Christ followers because, even though our lions might be different, we still need help in facing them.

One nice feature of this book was the summary at the end of each chapter.  There were several bullet points that hit the highlights from the chapter.  It would provide a good launching pad for discussion.

This is definitely a good read and one you should check out.

(I received this book from WaterBrook Multnomah in exchange for my review).